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Ask the experts

Here is a selection of Q&As from Your Herts and Beds Wedding magazine whether it be about flowers, hair and makeup, fashion, wedding themes, health & beauty, cakes, stationery, legal advice. If you would like your question answered by our experts, please email it to editor@yourhertsbeds.wedding

To view more Q&A's on a different topic, please select one from the list below.

Hot topic: Keep calm and marry on

Local pros answer your big-day woes

Floral extravaganza

Floral extravaganza

Q. I adore flowers and want them everywhere! As well as my bouquet, how else can we incorporate them into our big day?

A. Shane Maple says: Flowers are a really important part of your big-day décor. The more you have the bigger the wowfactor. Be sure to utilise all areas of your venue such as staircases, fireplaces and random shelves. Your centrepieces also provide a huge impact. High table arrangements will stand out more but don't forget about placing some smaller flowers around the base.

Your bridal party bouquets can be reused after the ceremony to help decorate your venue a little more too. They look lovely placed by the cake or guest book.

Big bake

Big bake

Q. We have a huge guest list and I'm worried that to have a cake large enough it'll be way over our budget. What can we do?

A. Claire Festa says: You don't have to keep adding tiers to feed big wedding parties. A lot of brides really want their dream centrepiece to wow their guests but the cost of a multi-tiered decorated cake can be way over budget. You could opt for a cutting cake and dummy tiers. It takes a lot of time and care to create stacked tiers that look sharp and professional and the smaller tiers don't provide a great deal of cake for guests so the same size cutting cakes in different flavours can be the answer.

The perfect dress

The perfect dress

Q. I'd love a princess dress but I'm really short and I'm worried I'll be swamped. What style should I steer toward to suit my tiny frame?

A. Cathy Smyth says: Finding the perfect gown for your body type can sometimes be a daunting task. If you have a petite frame it's best to find a gown that elongates your figure and a flattering A-line would be a good option. You will still get that princess look but without the excess layers. A fullon ball gown with lots of detail could drown you and can make you appear shorter than you really are.

By choosing a clean, fairly simple A-line dress you won't go far wrong. Being smaller it's always good to make sure the dress is balanced. You might need a shorter body and definitely a shorter length, so maybe go with a designer that'll accommodate this and do a made-to-measure service.

The makeover

The makeover

Q. We're tying the knot at 1pm – when would you suggest that we start our hair and make-up to be sure we're ready in time?

A. Lorna Kings says: There's nothing worse than feeling rushed on your big day so it's best to allow for plenty of time. I like my brides to be ready at least 30 minutes before they're due to leave for the ceremony. I allow for two hours starting with hair and then following with make-up to keep her looking as fresh as possible. If you're including a bridal party, I'd allocate an hour per hair and make-up for each additional person, which can mean an early start.

Time flies on the wedding morning but a good schedule is all you need. I prepare this for my brides so it's less stress for them and gives them more time for bubble sipping and enjoying the moment.

Snap happy

Snap happy

Q. My hubby-to-be is so camera-shy and hates having his photo taken. What can we do to help him overcome this fear so we get the best version of him on our pics?

A. Rafe Abrook says: It's perfectly natural to feel uncomfortable in front of the camera. An engagement shoot is a great opportunity to get used to the lens and to see how relaxed a portrait session can be. It also gives you some wonderful images to use for invites or decorations. A good photographer will quickly adapt to couples and their personalities on the day and to recognise when they've had enough. When the days are long I don't worry about getting too many couple shots before the wedding breakfast as the light will always be better early evening and there's usually more time then. I also have a dedicated second shooter to capture the groom's prep in the morning so he'll have loosened up to the camera by the time we get to the formalities.